Survivor: Cold War Conflict Resolution Workshops for At-Risk Youth

Posted: October 1, 2012 in Education, Emergency Preparedness, Local Community
Tags: ,

We have entered the Aviva Community Fund and we need your support to help make our idea to support at-risk youth with conflict resolution skills.

OVERVIEW:

Survivor: Cold War Conflict Resolution Workshops for At-Risk Youth

Imagine an interactive workshop designed to engage youth while learning key conflict resolutions skills. Imagine an immersive museum experience for at-risk youth in Ottawa. Imagine learning for the future, from the past.

An Immersive Interactive Experience

The Diefenbunker: Canada’s Cold War Museum, would like to use actual scenarios, designed by Emergency Preparedness Canada during the Cold War to train Canada’s top government officials, to teach at-risk youth valuable conflict resolution skills.

The Diefenbunker is a 100,000 square foot nuclear bunker. In the event of an attack on Ottawa, the Diefenbunker was designed to house 535 of the country’s most important political and military personnel. Today it is a Cold War Museum and National Historic Site, a unique and enthralling step back in time to an era of international political tension, paranoia and national emergency preparedness.

The Diefenbunker has been a museum, a private non-profit and a registered charity since 1998. We rely on the support of our community to keep the doors open to Canada’s only Cold War museum.

At the Diefenbunker, we have a new vision brought on by the creation of our new 5-year strategic plan. By showcasing Canada’s preparedness to secure the seat of government during the Cold War, the Diefenbunker creates this country’s most unique enjoyable, learning environment for present and future generations to better understand one of the most critical times in the world’s history. Our care of the Diefenbunker will make sure the best of the past is kept to enrich our lives today and in the future.

For the first time, we are faced with a generation of students who did not live through the Cold War. As Canada’s Cold War Museum, it is our job to teach youth the lessons of the Cold War. They are lessons in civil courage, in diplomacy and in conflict resolution. These lessons, in turn, can give at-risk youth valuable life skills. They can learn for their future, from the past.

Visit our project page for complete details and to vote: http://www.avivacommunityfund.org/ideas/acf13797

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